Success at Work at the Expense of Mental and Physical Well-Being

I saw this interview on CBC’s The National newscast, and it really spoke to me! Personally, I have NEVER been able to achieve a 40-hour work week without feeling utterly exhausted (and no, it’s not something my body gets used to), sacrificing relationships, and my mental and physical well being, and I KNOW many others feel the same way!

I have NEVER understood the societal norm and expectation of working full-time, beyond the fact that people tend to get paid per hour, and due to the cost of living, on average people need those 40 or more hours to pay all their expenses. That being said, that DOESN’T mean they’re performing at their best OR being entirely productive every single one of those hours. That’s not a knock on anyone, it’s just human nature.

From experience, I KNOW I function best when working approximately 20 to an absolutely maximum of 30 hours per week. No matter how hard I have tried to better manage my sleep, eating habits, or any other part of my lifestyle – that’s my max. Society can demand all it wants, but that’s my personal limit, and I am committed to respecting that – for my mental and physical well being!

If that means I earn less and have to do with less, then so be it. I’m happier, healthier, and more productive for it!

“When we’re told to sleep more, meditate, and slow down, we nod our heads in agreement, yet seem incapable of applying this advice in our own lives.

Why do we act against our creative best interests?

WE HAVE FORGOTTEN HOW TO FLOAT.

The answer lies in our history, culture, and biology. Instead of focusing on how we work, we must understand why we work―why we believe that what we do determines who we are.

Hustle and Float explores how our work culture creates contradictions between what we think we want and what we actually need, and points the way to a more humane, more sustainable, and, yes, more creative, way of working and living.”